Elderly generation of the population set to double over next quarter century  

The Office of National Statistics yesterday released a report on the potential future population size of the UK based on 2018 data.

Of note to the care sector is that the report highlights there will be an increasing numbers of older people in the future.   The proportion of the population aged 85 years and over is projected to nearly double in the next 25 years – in 2018 there were 1.6 million people aged 85 years and over, but by mid 2043, this is expected to reach nearly 3 million.  The report also considers growth in the different sectors of the population as divided between children/ working age people/pensioners, and predicts  that by 2043 the numbers of people at pensionable age will have grown the most.

The data from this report is for use in planning and policy in areas such as pensions and healthcare.  If the elderly population is set to double in the next quarter century, this inevitably will place further pressure on the care sector.  We have talked in previous blogs about the lack of consensus about how the care system is to be funded and organised going forward.  One can only hope that the government will take this report on board and consider the need for a robust and modern social care system.

A full copy of the report can be found here.


jb-85 Written by Jennifer Johnston

Think tank proposes free personal care for the over 65s to be funded by tax rise

In light of the government’s promise to publish a Green Paper on social care, the Institute of Public Policy Research has proposed in a new report a 2p tax rise in order to fund free help for elderly.  This would include help with basic tasks such as getting up and eating, as well as funding full time care for complex needs such as dementia.

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